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Safety


 

Emergencies

It is important that you find a safe and secure environment. If you're in immediate danger and need to contact UCPD, please call 911 from a “land line” or campus phone, or 510-642-3333 from a cell phone. UCPD can also help with information about Emergency Protective Orders and Temporary Restraining Orders. 

  • UCPD non-emergency number: (510) 642-6760

  • UCPD emergency number: 510-642-3333, or 911 from a campus phone

 

Education & Training


Click here to see Education Requirments details 

To prevent sexual violence - such as stalking, dating and domestic violence, and sexual assault - the fundamental causes of the violence must be addressed. These are not isolated crimes committed by people on the fringe of societal norms. These crimes are committed by individuals who are part of our society and who have learned behaviors of power and control, and use these strategies in their relationships.

Preventing sexual violence is not the responsibility of the survivor of the violence. Preventing sexual violence cannot be achieved by recommending that people restrict their activities in order to avoid being victimized.  Risk reduction is not prevention. Instead, all of us can take a stand to prevent violence by confronting violent beliefs and attitudes before the violent actions occur.


Required Training

To help prevent sexual violence, all members of the UC Berkeley community - students, staff, faculty and other academic appointees - are required to receive sexual violence prevention and intervention training and education regularly.

The curriculum, tailored to each audience, educates our community about sexual violence, how to prevent it, the role of intervention and what local resources are available.

Key concepts covered in the curriculum for every audience are:

  • Definitions of different forms of sexual violence.
  • Social norms, including the attitudes and beliefs that can normalize violence.
  • Bystander intervention.
  • Responding to sexual violence using methods that acknowledge the impact of violence and trauma on survivors’ lives.
  • Local resources, including confidential support for survivors of sexual violence and appropriate services for those accused of sexual violence.
  • Rights and opinions about reporting sexual violence.

Undergraduate Students

For current training requirments, please check: http://survivorsupport.berkeley.edu/education-requirement 

All students are required to complete trainings in order to be able to register for classes. This includes two components: an online training and an in-person presentation.

For New Fall 2016 Undergraduate Students*

  • Online training:Think About It: You are encouraged to complete this training prior to your arrival on campus.

    AND
  • In-person training: Bear Pact addresses important issues faced by college students: sexual violence and sexual harassment, mental health, and alcohol use. Students learn about the many ways to maintain a balanced lifestyle, and the resources on campus that can help you in this pursuit. Students will also gain strategies to take care of friends, classmates, and roommates. Bear Pact for 2016 incoming students occurred August 23.
  • *For students arriving in Spring 2017, we will update with dates for trainings, and proactively alert students.

Graduate Students

For current training requirments, please check: http://survivorsupport.berkeley.edu/education-requirement 

  • Online training: Think About It for Graduate Students will be available beginning July 5; a personalized link will be emailed to your berkeley.edu email address.

AND

  • In-person training: This is an hour long in-person presentation during the first 6 weeks of semester. There are several options available:
    • Any graduate student can attend a general session at New Graduate Student Orientation on August 23 (registration required)
    • Some schools are offering sessions as part of their new student orientation activities; check with your program for more information.
    • A makeup session will be offered on September 10.
    • More information about in-person sessions for graduate students can be found here.

Faculty and Supervisors
Faculty and supervisors will be required to complete two hours of sexual harassment prevention training every two years, and new faculty and supervisors are required to take training within the first two months of hire. Starting January 2016, a faculty training and education plan will be implemented that will revise the content in the current sexual harassment prevention training and will include training for those who work directly with students such as faculty student advisors. Faculty and supervisors will also receive training on their legal obligations to report sexual violence. Additional details will be available during the upcoming academic year.

Staff and Academic Appointees (Non-Supervisors)
Starting December 2015, a staff training and education plan will be implemented that will require new employees to receive training within the first six weeks of hire. All continuing staff will receive training annually. Designated employees who are required to report sexual violence to Office for the Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination (sometimes known as Title IX Office) will receive training on their legal obligations. Additional details will be available during the upcoming academic year.


Let’s Talk about Consent

According to UC policy, sexual assault is defined as “Any physical act of a sexual nature that is accomplished toward another without his/her consent.” So, understanding consent is necessary for recognizing and preventing sexual assault.

Consent is knowing exactly what and how much you are agreeing to, expressing your intent to participate, and deciding freely and voluntarily to participate.  

"Consent is an affirmative, unambiguous, and conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.

Consent is voluntary. It must be given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Consent means positive cooperation in the act or expression of intent to engage in the act pursuant to an exercise of free will.

Consent is revocable. Consent to some form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent to sexual activity on one occasion is not consent to engage in sexual activity on another occasion. A current or previous dating or sexual relationship, by itself, is not sufficient to constitute consent. Even in the context of a relationship, there must be mutual consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual encounter and can be revoked at any time. Once consent is withdrawn, the sexual activity must stop immediately.

Consent can not be given when a person is incapacitated. A person cannot consent if s/he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person cannot consent if s/he is under the threat of violence, bodily injury or other forms of coercion. A person cannot consent if his/her understanding of the act is affected by a physical or mental impairment."

From UC Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence


Step In!

Remember, our community has a shared responsibility to prevent sexual violence.  If you observe a situation that doesn’t seem quite right, here’s how you can help:

  1. Trust your intuition: If something feels “off,” it probably is.
  2. Decide to act: If you’re present, you’re already involved. Take a stand.
  3. Do the right thing: If someone is being hurt, help them. If they’re hurting themselves or someone else, stop them. Take an action, safely, to change the situation.
  4. Follow through: Make sure the immediate risk is over and that everyone involved is safe.
  5. Get back-up for yourself from people you can trust: friends, other students, staff and faculty.

For more about ways to notice and intervene in potentially harmful situations, watch this video from New Zealand’s “Who Are You?” campaign.  Note: This video contains potentially triggering material, as it depicts events leading to a sexual assault. If this is a concern for you, you can start the video at the 5:00 mark to view different ways to be a good bystander.

 


Campus Prevention Approaches

Multiple student groups and units on campus collaborate on prevention programs to:

  • Educate the campus community about sexual violence in the context of a university setting  and engage people in a commitment to get involved when they observe risky situations
  • Confront the oppressive stereotypes that are the basis for the disrespect that leads to interpersonal violence
  • Talk about healthy relationships and healthy sexuality, emphasizing the importance of communication and respecting personal boundaries
  • Coordinate campus-wide awareness efforts, such as town hall meetings, lectures, and other open spaces for dialogue on sexual violence
  • Links:
  • Gender Equity Resource Center: http://geneq.berkeley.edu/
  • University Health Services, Health Promotion: http://uhs.berkeley.edu/students/healthpromotion/
 

Learn Lessons from the Past

In 1991, Anita Hill testified before the U.S. Senate committee that then Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her while working for him -- igniting a national conversation on a difficult topic typically met with avoidance and silence. Hill became an icon, empowering people to stand up for equality and justice. Nearly 25 years later, the conversation has expanded to include campus sexual assault and violence. The video captures Hill, University of California President Janet Napolitano (an one of Hill's former attorneys), and UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks to discuss how lessons learned from the past can be applied today.

 

Definitions Related to Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence


From UC Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence

(The complete policy may be found at: http://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000385/SHSV)


Sexual Harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment is conduct that explicitly or implicitly affects a person’s employment or education or interferes with a person’s work or educational performance or creates an environment such that a reasonable person would find the conduct intimidating, hostile, or offensive. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence (see definition below). The University will respond to reports of any such conduct in accordance with the Policy.

Sexual harassment may include incidents between any members of the University community, including faculty and other academic appointees, staff, student employees, students, coaches, residents, interns, and non-student or non-employee participants in University programs (e.g., vendors, contractors, visitors, and patients). Sexual harassment may occur in hierarchical relationships, between peers, or between individuals of the same sex or opposite sex. To determine whether the reported conduct constitutes sexual harassment, consideration shall be given to the record of the conduct as a whole and to the totality of the circumstances, including the context in which the conduct occurred.

Consistent with the University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students, Policy 100.00 on Student Conduct and Discipline, Section 102.09, harassment of one student by another student is defined as unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature that is so severe and/or pervasive, and objectively offensive, and that so substantially impairs a person’s access to University programs or activities that the person is effectively denied equal access to the University’s resources and opportunities.


Sexual Violence is defined as physical sexual acts engaged without the consent of the other person or when the other person is unable to consent to the activity. Sexual violence includes sexual assault, rape, battery, and sexual coercion; domestic violence; dating violence; and stalking.


Domestic Violence is defined as abuse committed against an adult or a minor who is a spouse or former spouse, cohabitant or former cohabitant, or someone with whom the abuser has a child, has an existing dating or engagement relationship, or has had a former dating or engagement relationship.


Dating Violence is defined as abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.


Sexual Assault occurs when physical sexual activity is engaged without the consent of the other person or when the other person is unable to consent to the activity. The activity or conduct may include physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, or taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication).


Consent is informed. Consent is an affirmative, unambiguous, and conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.

Consent is voluntary. It must be given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Consent means positive cooperation in the act or expression of intent to engage in the act pursuant to an exercise of free will.

Consent is revocable. Consent to some form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent to sexual activity on one occasion is not consent to engage in sexual activity on another occasion. A current or previous dating or sexual relationship, by itself, is not sufficient to constitute consent. Even in the context of a relationship, there must be mutual consent to engage in sexual activity.

Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual encounter and can be revoked at any time. Once consent is withdrawn, the sexual activity must stop immediately.

Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated. A person cannot consent if s/he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person cannot consent if s/he is under the threat of violence, bodily injury or other forms of coercion. A person cannot consent if his/her understanding of the act is affected by a physical or mental impairment.

For purposes of this Policy, the age of consent is consistent with California Penal Code Section 261.5.


Incapacitation is defined as the physical and/or mental inability to make informed, rational judgments. States of incapacitation include, but are not limited to, unconsciousness, sleep, and blackouts. Where alcohol or drugs are involved, incapacitation is defined with respect to how the alcohol or other drugs consumed affects a person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. Being intoxicated by drugs or alcohol does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain consent. The factors to be considered when determining whether consent was given include whether the accused knew, or whether a reasonable person should have known, that the complainant was incapacitated.  


Stalking is behavior in which a person repeatedly engages in conduct directed at a specific person that places that person in reasonable fear of his or her safety or the safety of others. 

Healthy Relationships Make Us Feel...


 

  • Supported and respected
  • Confident and optimistic
  • Loved and cared for
  • Physically and emotionally safe
  • Happy

If this doesn't sound like your relationship, you may be experiencing an imbalance of power that already has or may lead to assaultive and coercive behavior. This may include physical, sexual, and psychological attacks as well as economic control.  

Relationships don't generally start out hurtful. The control and violence emerges over time, often after a great deal of emotional investment and commitment.  If you are just getting to know someone, trust your instincts. Take time to get to know someone. Communicate your expectations and boundaries from the beginning.

If you think you are being abused now, be assured the violence is not your fault. Partners often try to put the blame for their actions on the person they have hurt. There is no excuse for violence. Consider talking to a friend, family member or resource person who puts your safety first.

You don't have to be alone - help is available at UC Berkeley from UHS, Gender Equity, UCPD and others described below.

If you think you may be abusing your partner, take responsibility for your words and actions. Don’t blame your behavior on your partner, drugs, alcohol, stress, school or other excuses. Separate from your partner for now and seek help. Contact counseling services at UHS to talk to someone who can help you to stop the violence in your relationship.


"...violence is not inevitable...it is learned, and if it's learned, it can be un-learned."  Esta Soler, Violence Abuse Prevention Expert, TED talk, 2013


COMMON SIGNS OF AN UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIP

  • Your partner resents time you spend with others; is jealous.
  • You are afraid of your partner when s/he becomes angry.
  • Your partner has physically harmed you or threatened to hurt you, him/herself or your loved ones.
  • You are afraid to end this relationship.
  • You've done things you didn't want to do to keep your partner from getting angry.
  • Your partner disrespects your feelings or beliefs; ridicules or humiliates you or those close to you.
  • Your partner wants to know where you are every minute; texts constantly, turns up unexpectedly, and tracks you in any other way.
  • Your partner takes your money, car, valuables. 

You can't control your partner's violence, but you can choose your own actions and responses.

You do not need to have made a decision about the future of your relationship to talk to someone about it. If you are ready to start the conversation, here are some resources for you:

ON CAMPUS

Confidential counselors are available at the University Health Services in Social Services, Counseling & Psychological Services and Be Well at Work Employee Assistance (for Faculty and Staff).  If you are afraid for your safety, you may seek help from your local police department who can help with restraining orders and a safety plan. Gender Equity Resource Center and UHS social workers can also help you connect with shelters, legal assistance and other care, as needed. 

University Health Services is also a counseling resource for those who may be hurting their partners. Contact one of the above units and ask for help. 

COMMUNITY

The Alameda County Family Justice Center, http://www.acfjc.org/, 510-267-8800: one-stop center with multiple providers under one roof serving individuals and families impacted by violence.  They can provide or link people to a wide range of services.

24-HOUR CRISIS LINES

A Safe Place                          510-536-7233

Asian Women's Shelter (SF)    415-751-0880

Emergency Shelter Program    510-786-1246

Tri-Valley Haven                     1-800-884-8119

Family Violence Law Center...

          Mobile Response Team  510-757-5123

National Domestic Violence...

          Hotline                        1-800-799-7233

 

 

Stalking


Stalking is behavior in which a person repeatedly engages in conduct directed at a specific person that places that person in reasonable fear of his or her safety or the safety of others. Stalking behavior can including repeatedly following you, loitering near your class or work, or attempting to contact you; unwanted texts, calls or gifts; unwanted contact through social media; repeated, unwelcome inquiries about you made to your friends or family.

 


Taking Care of Yourself

If you think you are being stalked, develop a support system. Keep in touch with people who are supportive and understanding. Tell someone about each encounter with the stalker. You can reach out your resident assistant, a trusted friend or a coworker, or to UHS Social Services/Employee Assistance for support.

If you are being stalked, you may experience a range of emotions or physical symptoms. You are not going crazy; your body and mind are reacting to the extreme stress caused by the continuing victimization. Talking to someone who is trained to work with stalking targets and survivors may help alleviate some of the symptoms that might be interfering in other aspects of your life.

Psychological effects on targets/survivors can include:

  • Anger
  • Fear
  • Depression
  • Inability to trust
  • Changes in sleeping and/or eating patterns
  • Exhaustion and/or frequent crying spells
  • Inability to concentrate on your schoolwork
  • Declining academic or work performance

 


Stalking on College Campuses

  • Tell the stalker once that you do not want to have any further contact. Be firm. Please do not engage in further conversation or debate. The stalker wants to keep you involved in conversation and may try to manipulate your emotions to get you to continue communicating or interacting in some way.
  • Talk to someone., like a trusted friend of family member. Consider going to the University Police, UHS Social Services or connecting with the PATH to Care Center (confidential advocates who can support and help with safety planning), Dean of Students, or Gender Equity Resource Center for assistance. 
  • Never leave your residence hall room or office unlocked, even if you are inside the room. Think safety.
  • Some stalkers heavily use email or texting. If you are a target of unwanted electronic communication, contact the campus police.
  • Other tools stalkers use to find out about you, your movements and your friends are the Internet, social media, certain apps, talking to your peers, or checking out fitness centers and clubs you attend. They may also attempt to lure people through advertisements for rentals, items for sales or modeling/job opportunities.

Suggestions

  • Limit your use of social media and make certain to have the tightest controls possible; block your stalker.  Websites like Teaching Privacy (beta) share information about how your personal information can be used.
  • Review what is online about you - articles, awards, photos, directory information, social media, club membership lists and more.
  • Vary your routine, including changing routes to work, class, the gym, the lab and other places you regularly frequent.
  • Arrange a back-up place to stay. Be accompanied in public whenever possible.  Decide in advance what you will do if the stalker shows up at your home, work, class, or elsewhere.
  • Give your email, address and phone number to as few people as possible. Get an unlisted telephone and cel phone number.  Screen your calls, do not answer  calls from blocked numbers. Report threatening phone calls to the telephone company and the local police every time they occur. Keep a log.
  • Trace your calls: Use *69, call return (redials most recent number). You may then hang up at any time. Immediately after the call, phone the police to report the call and have them trace the number.
  • Form a contingency plan. Be prepared for a quick departure should the threats escalate. Keep reserve money, important items and phone numbers in an easily accessible place.
  • Inform professional organizations, Human Resources, your Department, or the Office of the Registrar that they are to provide no one with information about you.  
  • Consider getting a Temporary Restraining Order (court ordered) or a No Contact (campus directive) that requires the stalker to stay away from you and cease contact.
  • Lock all doors at home, in the residence hall, and in your car, even when you are inside.  Use deadbolt locks whenever possible.
  • If you are being followed, go to a safer area - DO NOT GO HOME.  Consider going to the nearest police station or a busy place.  If you're driving, use your horn to make noise to attract attention.
  • If you move residence, be aware of a "paper trail."  Avoid having anything forwarded to your new address.
  • Consider using websites, tools and apps (free or paid) that help to track incidents and offer suggestions/information - for example, StopaStalker, Circle of 6, Teaching Privacy (beta), OnWatch.

The University of California is committed to providing an environment free from discrimination and harassment on the basis of categories including:

  • Race
  • Color
  • National origin
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Sexual orientation/identity

The University of California policies prohibit sexual harassment, including all forms of sexual assault.

If you have any questions regarding sexual harassment and/or sexual assault, or would like to file a report, please contact:

Office for the Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination (OPHD)
510-643-7985
tixco@berkeley.edu
http://ophd.berkeley.edu/

 


UC Berkeley Campus Policies 

Sexual, racial, and other forms of harassment, defined as follows:

"Harassment is defined as conduct that is so severe and/or pervasive, and objectively offensive, and that so substantially impairs a person's access to University programs or activities, that the person is effectively denied equal access to the University's resources and opportunities on the basis of the person’s race, color, national or ethnic origin, alienage, sex, religion, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, veteran status, physical or mental disability, or perceived membership in any of these classifications."

 

 


University of California (UC) Systemwide Policies on Sexual, Racial, and Other Forms of Harassment 

Here are some links to UC systemwide policies: 


Federal Laws, Policies, and Reports

 

Glossary/FAQ


If you or someone you know has experienced sexual violence, you may have a lot of questions. Every question you have is valid and important. The University of California has created a document addressing many questions and there are trained professionals at UC Berkeley who are available to answer any questions you have and can offer compassionate, confidential support and counseling, if you wish.

These FAQs were designed by the University of California Office of the Presdient (UCOP) and apply across the entire UC system, inclyding at UC Berkeley. Specifically, they were developed by a working group formed by the President’s Task Force on Preventing and Responding to Sexual Violence and Sexual Assault. 


Glossary

Glossary
Glossary


FAQ

Care Advocates FAQ Get Help FAQ Reporting FAQ Understanding FAQ
Care Advocates FAQ Get Help FAQ Reporting FAQ Understanding Sexual Violence & Assault FAQ
Education and Training FAQs If You've Been Accused Sexual Violence Prevention and Intervention Training and Education
Education and Training FAQs If You Have Been Accused Sexual Violence Prevention and Intervention Training and Education Sexual Violence & Assault Investigation/Adjudication Model and Sanctions
     
FAQ: Talking to a Professor, Supervisor, or Other "Responsible Employee" Who is Required to Report      

 

 


University Health Services offers students after-hours emergency consultation with a counselor 
and crisis resource referrals by calling (855) 817-5667.